Africa
Books That Matter: How David Philip Publishers Managed to Reissue Banned Books During Apartheid

Books That Matter: How David Philip Publishers Managed to Reissue Banned Books During Apartheid

David Philip Publishers has shared an excerpt from Books That Matter: David Philip Publishers During the Apartheid Years, a memoir by Marie Philip. David Philip Publishers was established in 1971, with the aim of publishing “books that matter for Southern Africa” and challenging mainstream apartheid thinking. In 1992, Nadine Gordimer of the founders: “David and Marie...
Monday Interview: Samson Kambalu (Malawi)

Monday Interview: Samson Kambalu (Malawi)

Samson Kambalu was born in Malawi in 1975. He attended the Kamuzu Academy, the so-called “Eton of Africa”, graduated from the University of Malawi‘s Chancellor College in Zomba in 1999, and completed his MA in Fine Art at Nottingham Trent University in 2003. The best known of his artworks is Holy Ball, a football plastered in pages of the Bible. Kambalu...
Crunch Time for South African Publishing

Crunch Time for South African Publishing

This is a re-blog from arthurattwell.com. It’s rare that a national industry is confronted with a single threat to its future. That just happened to South African publishing. A few days ago, the South African Department of Basic Education released a policy document, for public comment, that explains how the DBE would like to handle textbooks...
„Take Risks“. Interview with Gary Cummiskey, Dye Hard Press, South Africa

„Take Risks“. Interview with Gary Cummiskey, Dye Hard Press, South Africa

The latest issue of African Poetry, published by the Centre for African Poetry (CAP) focuses on Gary Cummiskey’s Dye Hard Press, as part of a planned regular feature highlighting the work of book traders, agencies, educational institutions, publishers and bloggers with a notable commitment to African poetry. Since 1994 Dye Hard Press in South Africa...
Books and Publishing in South Africa: A publisher’s journey to tech and back

Books and Publishing in South Africa: A publisher’s journey to tech and back

This is a reblog from Arthur Attwell‘s own blog. In 2005, I left a big-publishing job and, without knowing it, set out on a mission to reimagine publishing for emerging markets. Since then I’ve worked on dozens of innovative technology projects, from creating musical ebooks to teaching maths on tablets. And now, after nine years...
Open access in Africa – green and gold, the impact factor, ‘mainstream’ and ‘local’ research

Open access in Africa – green and gold, the impact factor, ‘mainstream’ and ‘local’ research

Africa has been characterised as the ‘silent continent’ because so little of what Africa has to say has, in the past, reached beyond limited local audiences. Building on a long career in scholarly and academic textbook publishing, Eve Gray’s interest is in tracking the rapidly changing environment of scholarly communication in a digital world. She...
Eliot Elisofon’s Africa: Old, Updated, Worse

Eliot Elisofon’s Africa: Old, Updated, Worse

Eliot Elisofon did not cast “new light” or “refine Africa in a new and a complex way for American audiences,” as claimed in Susan Stamberg’s “‘Life’ Photographer Showed Africa Through a New Lens” on NPR (February 10, 2014) about an exhibit of Elisofon’s work at the Museum of African Art in Washington D.C. His subjectivity...
Ake Festival, Nigeria - where kids want to fly in colour

Ake Festival, Nigeria – where kids want to fly in colour

December saw the first Ake Arts & Book Festival in Abeokuta, Nigeria. British writer Christie Watson was one of many authors taking part. This is her report, first published on BookBrunch. We arrived at Lagos International Airport, a group of poets, novelists, artists, a graphic novelist, activists, some of whom were frequent visitors to Nigeria,...